The Metrics of Success on the Web

Firstly, what is success? Success is measured as an event that accomplishes its intended purpose.

To determine the success of a website, then, is to first define its target or intended purpose.

In the case of an online book store, the purpose of the website is to sell books to a wide audience and to become the preferred website for buying books online.

In the online world, as it is in the traditional business environment, the number of people who enter the business premises, or in this case, visit the website, greatly increases the chance of the website being a success.

What will make a website succeed as a business?

Marketing a website is vital to generating increased traffic. As sales increase so does an intrinsic part of business increase – profit.

With profit comes increased opportunities for the business to grow and to ultimately offer better service to its customers. This also ensures that the business can continue buying stock and doing business – therefore generating website traffic and awareness should be a top priority for the website owner.

But this in itself will still not make the website a success as the entire purpose may not yet have been met.

Marketing will get the target audience to the website but the website will need to offer value added services that will make the customer come back. This can include a wide range of books, rare or specialised books, ease of payment and quick or free delivery.

Appeal and user-friendliness

The appeal of the website is target market-specific, as a website about women’s beauty advice would not necessarily appeal to a man. The content of the website greatly determines the appeal.

The appeal of the content for the target market should therefore be included as a key component of the website’s intended purpose.

Another aspect of appeal is user-friendliness which applies to all websites as it is the vehicle in which the content is delivered to the user.

Using uncluttered and simplified interface elements makes it easier for the eye to catch the various sections of a page, making it easier for the user to read the content and find navigational items.

Complementing colours and legible font sizes will also help create a pleasant and engaging reading experience. Animated transition effects, using technologies such as Flash or Javascript, should be kept at a minimum as it uses more system resources, slowing the user’s web browser down, and also impedes the time between user requests and content delivery.

Using standardised and familiar interface elements, like a clear and easy-to-find navigation at the top of the page and a sitemap in the footer, helps users to instantly relate to the website and makes navigating and finding content easy to do.

User participation and interaction

Increased user participation and interaction has become the norm with modern websites. This is mostly due to a range of new technologies becoming available in the latest web browsers. Among these technologies are Ajax and Flash which has added real-time interaction to the web experience.

User participation increases the appeal of the website for the user which subsequently drives the website closer towards its success. User participation also contributes to the content of the website and can increase traffic through the use of social media services.

However, caution should be taken not to add every single feature that the social media and Web 2.0 world has to offer. If market research and common sense shows that it will not have a practical and lasting function, other than it being a trend at the time, then it should be avoided. Other than it being an unnecessary function, it will also be an extra cost on development, both in time and money.

What is required to enable this interaction?

The most obvious requirement for user participation is of course the users. Having a well implemented marketing and advertising campaign will take care of generating traffic to the website but if the information is not delivered and viewed in an accessible manner the marketing will lose its effectiveness and the website will not succeed. This takes us to the technological aspect of the website which actually precedes the marketing phase.

Most web servers today will have all the necessary technologies in place to handle and process the more complex programming tasks needed for user interaction.

The key tools that are required is a database server such as MySQL, used to store all the user contributed data, and a server-side programming language like PHP, to process the data, store it and display it again. Client-side processing, through Javascript, Ajax, or Flash, is achievable with most modern desktop web browsers.

There are many great third party Javascript frameworks available, such as jQuery, Prototype and Dojo that make implementing user interaction-level programming tasks quicker and much easier than creating a custom Javascript framework.

Special consideration must be given to mobile devices, as the technology used in theses devices are still in a more primitive stage than its desktop counterparts.

The measurement of success

The bottom line in ensuring a successful website is creating a website that focuses on a target market through its content and visual appeal and follows interface design standards that users are familiar with. If these conditions are met then the users will be able to easily find what they are looking for and they will return to the website looking for more.

There are of course many finer details to design that constitutes a good website interface but what experience dictates is that simplicity in design is key. Even in this age of heightened user-interactivity, less is most often more.

 

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